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Useful Information
     

USEFUL INFORMATION

A selection of items is provided below to support schools with various aspects of news and information relating to supporting schools with the revised Prevent Duty.  Additional information not covered below can also be found in the 'FAQs / Help' section accessed via the tabs above.   

Blue Ruler

   

DfE - REVISED KEEPING CHILDREN SAFE IN EDUCATION (September 2016)

Further to the recent consultation, the Department for Education has released the revised statutory guidance for schools and colleges which came into effect from 5th September 2016.  The guidance (updated from the previous May 2016 version) features a number of notable changes including specific sections on Preventing Radicalisation (Annex A, pg 56) and Online Safety (including appropriate filtering and monitoring expectations (Annex C, pg 62)).

Revised (September 2016) Keeping Children Safe in Education Guidance

PREVENT TRAGEDIES - 'LEFT BEHIND' SHORT FILM (July 2016)

Prevent Tragedies has launched a short film that describes the devastation caused to families whose loved ones have travelled or attempted to travel to a conflict zone, like Syria.  Left Behind focuses on the accounts of four police Prevent contact officers who have  supported families from across the country and witnessed first hand the anguish they go through as a consequence of a family member's actions.  From the initial shock through to the disruption to families, the officers talk frankly and openly and appeal to people who are concerned about a loved one who may be considering travel, to contact the police before it is too late.

Further information and related links are available in the 'Other Recommended Resources'  section on P4S.

REPORTING ONLINE TERRORIST CONTENT - the red 'STOP' button (June 2016)

The public can now report online content they suspect may be of a violent extremist or terrorist nature direct to a specialised police unit.  Clicking on the red 'REPORT' button (see right) or using the link below will take users to a dedicated online reporting site which can be completed anonymously.

https://www.gov.uk/report-terrorism

ONLINE RADICALISATION GUIDANCE FOR SCHOOLS (Spring 2016)

In response to regular enquiries received, the enclosed P4S Online Radicalisation guidance has been developed by Lancashire Safeguarding Children Board colleagues to support addressing Online Radicalisation as part of the broader Online Safeguarding agenda in schools. 

The guidance provides a number of considerations and recommendations for schools as well as signposts to a range of freely-available supporting tools and resources.

NEW HM GOVT E-LEARNING PACKAGE RELEASED (April 2016)

The Government have released an online e-learning resource designed to help raise awareness of radicalisation and support staff to identify the signs that someone may be at risk and where to go for support. Further information and related links are available in the 'Other Recommended Resources'  section on P4S.

 

DEDICATED HELPLINE FOR SCHOOL STAFF AND GOVERNORS (July 2015)

As identified in the above departmental advice, the Department for Education has recently launched a dedicated helpline for school staff and governors wishing to report a concern directly.

Note: The helpline is not intended for use in emergency situations. 

Information on the helpline including what to do if you have a concern can be found on p.10 in the Departmental Advice publication below.

DfE - THE PREVENT DUTY: DEPARTMENTAL ADVICE FOR SCHOOLS AND CHILDCARE PROVIDERS (June 2015)

The Department for Education has issued the departmental advice to help recipients understand the implications of the revised Prevent Duty 2015. The advice can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protecting-children-from-radicalisation-the-prevent-duty

As identified in the advice, 'Schools and childcare providers should have clear procedures in place for protecting children at risk of radicalisation. These procedures may be set out in existing safeguarding policies. It is not necessary for schools and childcare settings to have distinct policies on implementing the Prevent duty. General safeguarding principles apply to keeping children safe from the risk of radicalisation as set out in the relevant statutory guidance, Working together to safeguard children and Keeping children safe in education.'

HM GOVERNMENT - THE REVISED PREVENT DUTY GUIDANCE (March 2015)

Statutory guidance for specified authorities issued by HM Govt on the duty in the Counter-Terrorism and Security Act 2015. 

All specified authorities must have due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism.  Issued March 2015 and revised July 2015.

The guidance can be found via the image on the left or at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/prevent-duty-guidance

THE USE OF SOCIAL MEDIA IN ENCOURAGING TRAVEL - BRIEFING NOTE FOR SCHOOLS (July 2015)

There is increasingly widespread recognition that terrorist and extremist organisations are utilising the Internet and Social Media for the radicalisation and grooming of Young People.  Further to this, the Department for Education and the Home Office have issued the joint enclosed briefing note for schools re: Social Media being used to encourage travel (see link below) highlighting some of these aspects and actions schools should take.

Briefing Note for schools: Social Media and Travel

 

COLLEGE OF POLICING E-LEARNING PACKAGE - CHANNEL AND VULNERABILITY TO EXTREMISM (Spring 2015)

The National Counter Terrorism Policing Headquarters (NCTP HQ), in conjunction with the College of Policing (CoP), have launched an e-learning module on 'Channel General Awareness' on the College's Managed Learning Environment.  Channel is a multi-agency process designed to safeguard individuals. It includes information on how Channel links to the Government's Counter-Terrorism Strategy (CONTEST) through the Prevent Strategy. It provides guidance on how to ‘recognise, understand and refer on’ around people who may be vulnerable to radicalisation.

The package takes approximately 25 minutes to complete.  The demands placed on all staff are acknowledged, however, given the current threat faced completion of this knowledge package and refreshment of previous advice is recommended to support further awareness and understanding.  The package has been trialled internally and externally in Lancashire and feedback is very positive.

Logon for partners is via:-  http://course.ncalt.com/Channel_General_Awareness

DfE - PROMOTING FUNDAMENTAL BRITISH VALUES THROUGH SMSC (Nov 2014)

Departmental advice for schools from the DfE on promoting pupils’ Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural (SMSC) development, including what is expected of schools in promoting fundamental British values and how this aligns with schools’ duty to promote SMSC.  Schools should promote the fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/promoting-fundamental-british-values-through-smsc

DfE - TEACHING APPROACHES THAT HELP TO BUILD RESILIENCE TO EXTREMISM AMONG YOUNG PEOPLE (May 2011)

A report commissioned by the DfE presenting the findings from a large-scale, in-depth research study into teaching methods – knowledge, skills, teaching practices and behaviours – that help to build resilience to extremism. The focus is on teaching methods to be used in a general classroom setting rather than as part of interventions targeted at those deemed at risk of extremism.

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/182675/DFE-RR119.pdf

   

 

 

P4S Archive:


 

DfE - THE PREVENT DUTY: Departmental advice for schools and childcare providers (July 2015)

The Department for Education has issued the departmental advice below to help recipients understand the implications of the Prevent Duty. 

The publication can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protecting-children-from-radicalisation-the-prevent-duty

As identified in the advice, 'Schools and childcare providers should have clear procedures in place for protecting children at risk of radicalisation. These procedures may be set out in existing safeguarding policies. It is not necessary for schools and childcare settings to have distinct policies on implementing the Prevent duty. General safeguarding principles apply to keeping children safe from the risk of radicalisation as set out in the relevant statutory guidance, Working together to safeguard children and Keeping children safe in education.'

 


 

DEDICATED HELPLINE FOR SCHOOL STAFF AND GOVERNORS (July 2015)

As identified in the above departmental advice, the DfE has recently launched a dedicated helpline for school staff and governors wishing to report a concern directly (Note: The helpline is not intended for use in emergency situations).  Information on what to do if you have a concern can be found in the Departmental Advice publication above.

 


 

LAUNCH OF ‘E ‘RESOURCES FOR KS 3&4 - TERRORISM AND EXTREMISM.

In 2008, the then Department for Children, Schools and Families launched ‘ Learning Together to be Safe – a toolkit to help schools contribute to the prevention of violent extremism. The body of work Nationally around is known as ‘The Prevent Strategy’ and this forms part of the Government’s Counter Terrorism Strategy known as CONTEST. The aim of ‘Prevent’ is to stop people becoming or supporting terrorists and to do this by challenging ideologies, protecting vulnerable individuals and supporting institutions, such as schools.

When the toolkit was originally launched, Lancashire Secondary schools were invited to some seminars, held in Preston, to seek their views. Research was also conducted with Independent Schools. The feedback was that the toolkit was not really a toolkit i.e. there were no actual resources to use, some teachers felt lacking in confidence to deal with these sensitive topics, there were concerns about where these subjects fitted into the demands of the curriculum and discussions on how ‘Prevent’ could be covered within safeguarding frameworks. Some schools felt that related issues such as diversity, citizenship and discussion of events occurring nationally and globally were already covered particularly within the PHSE/SEAL/ECM agendas and a few felt that’ Prevent’ was not for them.

A ‘Lancashire Prevent Education’ group was formed from relevant partners initially led by the Constabulary but now by education. The group was assisted by some willing schools who offered to support this work and look at the issues involved locally. Since that time, a number of resources have been developed by Lancashire Constabulary, partners and providers and these have been trialled by some ‘Champion Schools’. The products were initially launched in a hard copy resource folder, with DVD’s inside, for North West schools but these have not been universally available for schools to access.

On 26th April 2012, there was an e-launch of the resources. Invitations were sent out via LCC and the Unitary Authorities. This launch gave schools a chance to see the resources first hand, meet colleagues from the Department for Education and hear what the new Teaching Standards and Ofsted have to say on these topics but more importantly, there was a chance to speak to some of the ‘Prevent Champion’ schools in Lancashire who have been working with this agenda and share their experiences.

 

Quote from the Toolkit:-

‘Extremists of all persuasions try to paint the world as black and white, accentuating division and difference, and exploiting fears based on ignorance or prejudice.

Education can be a powerful weapon. against this, equipping young people with the knowledge, skills and reflex to think for themselves, to challenge and to debate; and giving young people the opportunity to learn about different cultures and faiths and, crucially, to gain an understanding of the values we share. Exploring ideas, developing a sense of identity and forming views are a normal part of growing up.

Schools can support young people in this: providing a safe environment for discussing controversial issues and helping young people understand how they can influence and participate in decision-making. We need to encourage young people to express their views but also to appreciate the impact their views can have on others, to take responsibility for their actions and to understand that the use of violence to further any cause is criminal.

We also need to recognise that, while it remains very rare for school age children to become involved in extremist activity to the point of committing criminal acts, young people can be exposed to extremist influences or prejudiced views, including via the internet, from an early age. As with other forms of criminality or risk of harm, early intervention is always preferable. Schools, working with other local partners, families and communities, can help support pupils who may be vulnerable as part of wider safeguarding responsibilities.’

 

DfE - THE PREVENT DUTY: Departmental advice for schools and childcare providers (July 2015)

The Department for Education has issued the departmental advice below to help recipients understand the implications of the Prevent Duty. 

The publication can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/protecting-children-from-radicalisation-the-prevent-duty

As identified in the advice, 'Schools and childcare providers should have clear procedures in place for protecting children at risk of radicalisation. These procedures may be set out in existing safeguarding policies. It is not necessary for schools and childcare settings to have distinct policies on implementing the Prevent duty. General safeguarding principles apply to keeping children safe from the risk of radicalisation as set out in the relevant statutory guidance, Working together to safeguard children and Keeping children safe in education.'


DEDICATED HELPLINE FOR SCHOOL STAFF AND GOVERNORS (July 2015)

As identified in the above departmental advice, the DfE has recently launched a dedicated helpline for school staff and governors wishing to report a concern directly (Note: The helpline is not intended for use in emergency situations).  Information on what to do if you have a concern can be found in the Departmental Advice publication above.


LAUNCH OF ‘E ‘RESOURCES FOR KS 3&4 - TERRORISM AND EXTREMISM.

In 2008, the then Department for Children, Schools and Families launched ‘ Learning Together to be Safe – a toolkit to help schools contribute to the prevention of violent extremism. The body of work Nationally around is known as ‘The Prevent Strategy’ and this forms part of the Government’s Counter Terrorism Strategy known as CONTEST. The aim of ‘Prevent’ is to stop people becoming or supporting terrorists and to do this by challenging ideologies, protecting vulnerable individuals and supporting institutions, such as schools.

When the toolkit was originally launched, Lancashire Secondary schools were invited to some seminars, held in Preston, to seek their views. Research was also conducted with Independent Schools. The feedback was that the toolkit was not really a toolkit i.e. there were no actual resources to use, some teachers felt lacking in confidence to deal with these sensitive topics, there were concerns about where these subjects fitted into the demands of the curriculum and discussions on how ‘Prevent’ could be covered within safeguarding frameworks. Some schools felt that related issues such as diversity, citizenship and discussion of events occurring nationally and globally were already covered particularly within the PHSE/SEAL/ECM agendas and a few felt that’ Prevent’ was not for them.

A ‘Lancashire Prevent Education’ group was formed from relevant partners initially led by the Constabulary but now by education. The group was assisted by some willing schools who offered to support this work and look at the issues involved locally. Since that time, a number of resources have been developed by Lancashire Constabulary, partners and providers and these have been trialled by some ‘Champion Schools’. The products were initially launched in a hard copy resource folder, with DVD’s inside, for North West schools but these have not been universally available for schools to access.

On 26th April 2012, there was an e-launch of the resources. Invitations were sent out via LCC and the Unitary Authorities. This launch gave schools a chance to see the resources first hand, meet colleagues from the Department for Education and hear what the new Teaching Standards and Ofsted have to say on these topics but more importantly, there was a chance to speak to some of the ‘Prevent Champion’ schools in Lancashire who have been working with this agenda and share their experiences.

 

Quote from the Toolkit:-

‘Extremists of all persuasions try to paint the world as black and white, accentuating division and difference, and exploiting fears based on ignorance or prejudice.

Education can be a powerful weapon. against this, equipping young people with the knowledge, skills and reflex to think for themselves, to challenge and to debate; and giving young people the opportunity to learn about different cultures and faiths and, crucially, to gain an understanding of the values we share. Exploring ideas, developing a sense of identity and forming views are a normal part of growing up.

Schools can support young people in this: providing a safe environment for discussing controversial issues and helping young people understand how they can influence and participate in decision-making. We need to encourage young people to express their views but also to appreciate the impact their views can have on others, to take responsibility for their actions and to understand that the use of violence to further any cause is criminal.

We also need to recognise that, while it remains very rare for school age children to become involved in extremist activity to the point of committing criminal acts, young people can be exposed to extremist influences or prejudiced views, including via the internet, from an early age. As with other forms of criminality or risk of harm, early intervention is always preferable. Schools, working with other local partners, families and communities, can help support pupils who may be vulnerable as part of wider safeguarding responsibilities.’

 

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